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Cadgwith a fishing village lost in time

Traditional fishing harbour and village - Cadgwith

We looked back to Cadgwith with the fishing boats pulled up just below the cottages at low tide

If you are planning to visit just one fishing village in Cornwall then make it Cadgwith sheltering in the lea of the most southerly point of The Lizard.

There is a timeless air about the glorious jumble of thatched cottages hugging the slipway to the sea where the fishing boats lay on the shingle beach waiting for the tide, just as they always have been over the centuries.

Two rough hewn granite posts topped by jaunty ovoid boulders mark the entrance to Cadgwith giving it a sense of stepping back in time to a carefully guarded community unchanging with the centuries.

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Bonython Estate Gardens

Trees reflected in a lake - bonython gardens

The magnificent Gunnera lake is everything you would expect a lake to be, cool and elegantly stylish

Bonython Gardens with its 18th century walled gardens, tranquil lakes and dramatic sweeps of parkland is almost a hidden gem amongst the Great Gardens of Cornwall.

With its laid back approach, Bonython is definitely a must for garden visitors seeking to step off the “Tourist Trail” and move into another world of old fashioned hospitality in a deeply personal garden.

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The haunting beauty of Kynance Cove

turquoise seas blue skies - kynance coveKynance Cove truly does have a haunting beauty set below the undulating contours of enfolded green cliffs on the Lizard Peninsular.  This soft sandy world of mysterious plazas, punctuated by towering stacks of gleaming dark serpentine, is not to be missed when visiting Cornwall.

On a picture perfect October day this autumn we visited Kynance Cove, , when the clear blue skies showed the famously clear, turquoise blue sea there, at their very best. Continue reading “The haunting beauty of Kynance Cove” »

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Shadows of history in Poltesco Valley

Sea views from Poltesco valleyWe could almost feel the history simmering in the shadows as we walked down through the sheltered valley of Poltesco to visit Carleon Cove on the Lizard Peninsula at the end of the summer.

The wildlife haven of Poltesco, managed now by the National Trust, conceals a long industrial history in the soft verdant greenery, in a timeless peaceful mantle.

We were charmed as we walked down through the sub tropical depths of Poltesco valley to the sea by occasional art works almost enveloped by the vegetation but artfully places there as a counterpoint to each twist and turn in the path.  And yet how different this valley would have been when the Serpentine works was in full production and the cargo was ferried from the cove in flat bottomed barges to schooners waiting in the bay. Continue reading “Shadows of history in Poltesco Valley” »

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Explore Gunwalloe, Dollar and Poldhu Coves

Gunwalloe and Dollar coves from the cliff topWe’ve made the most of the balmy autumn days to explore some of the pretty coves and villages and made a visit to The Lizard on a beautiful autumn day to seek out the intriguingly named Gunwalloe Cove and Dollar Cove that are  separated by the romantically named “The church of Storms” before travelling on to the popular beach of Poldhu just around the point.

This AONB (the area of outstanding natural beauty) that has the same protection as a national park and flanks the Helford River and it encompasses The Lizard Peninsular as well as the coastline all the way through Perranuthnoe to St Michael’s Mount near Penzance.

I had another reason to visit too because the ley lines cross at Gunwalloe as they do at St Michael’s Mount and so it has a very special place in local heritage. Continue reading “Explore Gunwalloe, Dollar and Poldhu Coves” »

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The Lizard and Kennack Sands

Kennack Sands on the Lizard Peninsular in CornwallWe made a pilgrimage to The Lizard Peninsular yesterday to visit Kennack Sands – a sandy beach that held fond memories for Charles as the scene of many of boyhood adventures – although yesterday it might have been said to be a little more crowded than it was fifty-four yeas ago!

Still with the house and the horses settled we set off with our usual picnic turning right at the crossroads to follow the winding road along to Helston and then fork out passed the big navel station at Culdrose. Finally we reached the endless flat heathland with a horizon broken by the iconic, yet redundant, deep space facility of giant satellite dishes, joined now by the latest craze – the big white wind turbines in tidy lines – I wonder which will stay the longest?! Continue reading “The Lizard and Kennack Sands” »