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Trebah Gardens an autumn pilgrimage

Sub tropical gardens -Trebah

Trebah Gardens in November

We explored Trebah garden again yesterday, as the golden leaves of autumn swirled around our feet. This magnificent garden is in a lush sheltered river valley running down to the sea and the garden coaxes you along its well manicured paths with all of the authority of a vintage Rolls Royce.

The Walk from the lush palms at the top of the garden down through the valley is always accompanied by the gurgle of water passing through the gardens heart, until finally the sound of the waves landing on the shore below signal the Helford River and the sea.
Trebah is so evocative of the heady bygone worlds described by Rosamunde Pilcher and Daphne Du Maurier etched in my imagination yet there is poignancy there too, in the memory of the men that left the rarefied world of the sub tropical valley at Trebah, one dark night for the D day landings never to return. Continue reading “Trebah Gardens an autumn pilgrimage” »

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The haunting beauty of Kynance Cove

turquoise seas blue skies - kynance coveKynance Cove truly does have a haunting beauty set below the undulating contours of enfolded green cliffs on the Lizard Peninsular.  This soft sandy world of mysterious plazas, punctuated by towering stacks of gleaming dark serpentine, is not to be missed when visiting Cornwall.

On a picture perfect October day this autumn we visited Kynance Cove, , when the clear blue skies showed the famously clear, turquoise blue sea there, at their very best. Continue reading “The haunting beauty of Kynance Cove” »

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Secret Cornwall – twelve secluded beaches

cornwall secret beaches looking down on sandy beachExplore the secrets of West Cornwall with twelve of the most unspoilt secluded beaches and coves this week set along the hauntingly beautiful coast. They are almost a secret but not quite if you are armed with a well thumbed ordnance survey map and a pair of walking boots to follow Cornwall’s dramatic cliff top walks and lush valleys to the sound of the sea. So shh don’t tell and I will tell you some of my favourite spots to enjoy an idyllic day away from the tourist spots in unspoilt secret West Cornwall. Continue reading “Secret Cornwall – twelve secluded beaches” »

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Memories of Sennen

Nostalgic cornish harbourAs the winter days stretch out before us I’ve found myself looking fondly back on our autumn beach adventures and realised I hadn’t shared our memories of Sennen. Sennen was one of the last beaches that we visited before settling down to working life and routines of a winter farm.

The storm crested waves tore across the cove at Sennen that day, trailing plumes of spray that day and yet when we walked up towards the sheltered honeyed granite harbour with sea worn walls the sea lay surprisingly tranquil. What a timeless memory of a visit to sennen Cove to see my photo album
Continue reading “Memories of Sennen” »

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Explore Gunwalloe, Dollar and Poldhu Coves

Gunwalloe and Dollar coves from the cliff topWe’ve made the most of the balmy autumn days to explore some of the pretty coves and villages and made a visit to The Lizard on a beautiful autumn day to seek out the intriguingly named Gunwalloe Cove and Dollar Cove that are  separated by the romantically named “The church of Storms” before travelling on to the popular beach of Poldhu just around the point.

This AONB (the area of outstanding natural beauty) that has the same protection as a national park and flanks the Helford River and it encompasses The Lizard Peninsular as well as the coastline all the way through Perranuthnoe to St Michael’s Mount near Penzance.

I had another reason to visit too because the ley lines cross at Gunwalloe as they do at St Michael’s Mount and so it has a very special place in local heritage. Continue reading “Explore Gunwalloe, Dollar and Poldhu Coves” »

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Kennegy Beach – a secret sandy bay beyond Prussia Cove

Kennegy beach at low tide with the sea still glistening on the sandsThis autumn we’ve set out to explore the beautiful hidden beaches of West Cornwall that are within easy reach of Ednovean Farm. This week we visited the secret sandy bay just beyond Prussia cove, known as Kennegy Beach a beautiful cove of pristine golden sands framed by heathland with farmland dipping down to the cliffs edge

As we scrambled across the rock to the great sweep of golden sands, ours were the only footprints on the beach and our only company the seagulls preening at the waters edge. Continue reading “Kennegy Beach – a secret sandy bay beyond Prussia Cove” »

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Discover the hidden silver sands at Portheras Cove

A sandy cove surounded by wild windswept cliffs in CornwallWe set out last week to discover the hauntingly beautiful Portheras Cove of silvery white sands, and found it was a perfect walk for an autumn day with the magic of summer still lingering in the air.

Portheras Cove is set between Pendeen and Morvah and it can only be reach on foot along the coastal path. But it is so worth taking the walk to this quiet and secluded cove that attracts only the dedicated locals who look after the beach, passing walkers along the coastal route around West Cornwall and seals resting on the sands Continue reading “Discover the hidden silver sands at Portheras Cove” »

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Land’s End to St Ives

Cape Cornwall - the only cape in britain

Cape Cornwall from the air

The final part of the Penwith tour will take you from Land’s End to St Ives and surely this drive  must be Cornwall’s own route 66. The road contained by ancient banks twists through farmland flanked by tiny fields whose boundaries date back to the bronze age. with the sea an eve present backdrop it is not surprising it has been voted one of  the nation’s favourite drives. Expect to pass through tiny hamlets and farmyards; to see remnants of the Cornish mining industry romantic now in their decay; to see villages flanked by towering moorland cairns on a winding road that will almost transport you back to an earlier era.

I am indebted to Mike McNally photography for the aerial views I am about to share with you. Mike and his wife took a scenic flight from Lands End when they stayed with us at Ednovean Farm and kindly sent us a disk of snaps of West Cornwall.

  1. Sennen
  2. Cape Cornwall
  3. Botallack
  4. Pendeen
  5. Portharas
  6. Gurnard’s Head
  7. Zennor
  8. St Ives

Continue reading “Land’s End to St Ives” »

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Coastal walks and harbour pubs

Trebarvah beach linked to Perranuthnoe

Just east of Perranuthnoe, a hidden slipway leads to Trebarvah Beach reached by a hidden slipway or walk along the sands from Perran at very low tide.

There is something so evocative of the memories Cornish holidays of spending the days wandering around the coastal footpath before finally settling in a secluded cove to picnic and then later, much later, driving around the Bay to find a traditional harbour side pub for supper. It has to be Fish and Chips of course anything else would be sacrilege to tradition!

This bank Holiday the weather has been so kind to Cornwall and we have basked in the sunshine and we were tempted to walk again down to the coastal footpath to see the last of the spring flowers with the tide lapping the rocks below us. Continue reading “Coastal walks and harbour pubs” »

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A spring walk to the sea

Walking from Ednovean fArm to the coastla footpath for this view along the way

The May is slow to flower this year but Perranuthnoe’s sandy beach had just been exposed by the tide and St Michael’s Mount was framed by Penzance

Everybody has their spring rituals I’m sure and for us, it is a walk down to the sea again, that stretch of blue that frames our horizon The sea so close that it frames our days and yet with winter jobs to do in the stables, it is so very so very far away. But with the weather set fair on Saturday we set off to walk across the couple of fields that leads to Trebarvah and then follow the narrow lane down to the fork to towards the coastal footpath in what has become our own spring ritual – the first walk to the sea for the year! Continue reading “A spring walk to the sea” »