Image

Carn Euny ancient village

Carn Euny west penwith

The best preserved ancient village in South west Britain

I often suggest to our guests that are seeking early villages a trip to Carn Euny an ancient courtyard settlement, set around an accessible fogou deep, in the heart of West Penwith.  Cornwall has a wonderful ancient heritage from which it is possible to trace the early societies that lived here and linger just for a moment in their shadow.  Carn Euny is managed by Cornwall Heritage Trust with parking in a little lay-by about 600 metres from the site and access is free. Continue reading “Carn Euny ancient village” »

Image

Ednovean Farm – what is in a name?

Ednovean Farm today

The mellow granite building that is now our home has stood over the centuries on this spot at Ednoe-Vean

One question I’m often asked by our bed and breakfast guests is “What is the meaning of Ednovean?” And of course with farm and field names they hold knowledge of ancient names for the area.

The name Ednovean was originally two words Ednoe-Vean and is mentioned in one of my favourite books for place name reference “Cornish Place-names” by O.J. Padel. The description there of the evolution of the name for Perranuthnoe and the reference to Ednovean is fascinating. Continue reading “Ednovean Farm – what is in a name?” »

Image

The smugglers of Prussia Cove

Prussia Cove a famous smugglers cove in West CornwallOne of our guests favourite walks from Ednovean farm is eastwards towards Cudden Point and as they walk the coastal paths around the bay towards Prussia Cove they follow the paths the smugglers have trodden in past centuries.

The sheltered waters of Mount’s Bay and the hidden coves that are tucked along its edges have a rich dark history and today I thought I’d tell you a little bit more about the smugglers and shipwrecks in our part of the bay. As I researched for today’s post I came across a rich dramatic history in the lives that moved between Cornwall, Guernsey, France and over to the Americas; a history that touched the turbulent times of France in the shadow of the guillotine and mingled with the lives of the negro slaves in the New world; that found a kind of respectability as with ships of marque; were arrested for piracy but had mysterious friends in high place at the admiralty; murders and sea battles; and final betrayal and return to poverty. Continue reading “The smugglers of Prussia Cove” »