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Three Beach walks to blow the cobwebs away

winter walks with light reflected on the sandsAs shortest day approaches inevitably there are days when it really doesn’t seem to get truly light at all. Winter can bring us gloomy numpty days of dull half light and moody shadows but Cornwall has the perfect antidote to these days – an escape to the sea. Walk along the sea shore as white rimmed waves dissolve at your feet amongst fleeting scats of foam and you will feel invigorated and renewed. On the beach the light is magnified as it bounces off of the water, the gulls’ wheal overhead in their eternal dance with the breeze shrieking their defiance to the waves and more importantly for us the gift of negative ions to lift the mood and soothe the soul.

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Cadgwith a fishing village lost in time

Traditional fishing harbour and village - Cadgwith

We looked back to Cadgwith with the fishing boats pulled up just below the cottages at low tide

If you are planning to visit just one fishing village in Cornwall then make it Cadgwith sheltering in the lea of the most southerly point of The Lizard.

There is a timeless air about the glorious jumble of thatched cottages hugging the slipway to the sea where the fishing boats lay on the shingle beach waiting for the tide, just as they always have been over the centuries.

Two rough hewn granite posts topped by jaunty ovoid boulders mark the entrance to Cadgwith giving it a sense of stepping back in time to a carefully guarded community unchanging with the centuries.

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We visited St Ives

Large sandy harbour - St Ives

The vast stretch of sand in St Ives Harbour

We visited St Ives at last this week and found summer seemed to linger on within the bustling streets and thronged harbour even though it was late in October.

The bustling tourist destination of St Ives is so different from the quiet, laid back, world of Mounts Bay and so we eased ourselves gently into the visit by taking the Train from Lelant Saltings. The train runs from here about every thirty minutes so there is never long to wait and the ten minute journey has spectacular views

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Our visit to St Michael’s Mount

Our visit to St Michael's Mount- HarbourWe made a long planned visit to St Michael’s Mounts this week, finally taking advantage of the gentler pace of life that arrives with autumn in Cornwall. Autumn is such a special time of year – the days are still warm and those special spots are far less crowded – just right for a visit in fact!

St Michael’s Mount has an ancient Cornish name – “Karrek Loos yn Koos” referring back to a time before the swampy forest in what is now Mounts Bay was submerged under the seas. The journey to the St Michael’s Mount today encompasses the long history beginning with the pagan legends of giants, with a causeway at low tide that follows a pilgrim’s path towards a monastic island where the archangel St Michael’ was said to have appeared to the fishermen.

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Autumn a season of joys and consolations

Bronze Autumn Bracken frames a view across the sea to St Michael's Mount

St Michael’s Mount from the coastal footpath around Mounts bay

Autumn days brings those glorious days of bright sunshine and cool clear air, days of racing waves trailing plumes of vapour and the thoughts of cosy warm suppers tucked beside the ancient inglenook of a pub high on the moors.

The country lanes are filled with tawny leaves drifting underfoot, the high warm banks dressed in russet bracken now with rich red berries spangling the hedgerows occasionally I meet the occasional walkers clasping an Ordnance Survey map in lanes softly enveloped by autumn at its best.

The changing pace of life of the autumn has finally given us a chance to purge the debris generated by “The Beast from the East with bonfires sending lazy plumes of smoke up into the air.

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Away down to Lamorna

Harbour wall and shletering landscape - lamorna cove

The harbour at Lamorna – notice the winter storm damage that sent granite blocks tumbling to the sands

“Away down to Lamorna” is chorus of a famous Cornish song and I had forgotten just how beautiful Lamorna Valley was, until we drove down through the valley to the harbour again this week.

The tinge of autumn was yet to touch the luscious green of the all enveloping trees in this sheltered valley and summer lingered on for a perfect late autumn day.

We had planned a lunch at the Lamorna Wink before a visit to Chygurno Gardens on one of its last open days before the winter. As the season slips from summer to autumn we’ve already revisited several gardens this year – gardens that we first visited when planning our own gardens and we previously visited the terraced Gardens of Chygurno back in about 2000 just as the first Tree Ferns were planted.

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Is it autumn yet?

Autumn russet bracken framing ST Michael's Mount in a blue sea

St Michael’s Mount from the coastal footpath near Perranuthnoe

Should we say it is autumn yet I wonder? Well this week summer blew Cornwall a parting kiss and delivered blues skies, warm seas and gorgeous sunshine to the days, as we drift between the meteorological* autumn and the autumn equinox* in the hinterland known as late summer.

These balmy late summer days are just perfect to walk along the tranquil coastal footpaths and soak up the sun on the empty beaches, so join me in this week’s blog to explore a secluded cove in the shadow of St Michael’s Mount and watch dusk fall over a fish supper in Marazion, as summer blows a parting kiss.

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Bonython Estate Gardens

Trees reflected in a lake - bonython gardens

The magnificent Gunnera lake is everything you would expect a lake to be, cool and elegantly stylish

Bonython Gardens with its 18th century walled gardens, tranquil lakes and dramatic sweeps of parkland is almost a hidden gem amongst the Great Gardens of Cornwall.

With its laid back approach, Bonython is definitely a must for garden visitors seeking to step off the “Tourist Trail” and move into another world of old fashioned hospitality in a deeply personal garden.

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Cooling Sea breezes in the heat wave

Waves breaking on sandy beach - perranuthnoe in the heatwave

Perranuthnoe’s sandy beach flanked by smaller coves

The sea has never seemed bluer than this month as the heat wave changed our lives to a Mediterranean rhythm, as day after day of endless sunshine spread before us.  We abandoned work in the afternoons to settle at the seas edge below the red baked clay cliffs of one the little coves that flank the sand of around Perranuthnoe Beach. The tranquil rhythm of the waves slipping idly on to the beach and slight breeze from the sea has been blissful this month in Cornwall with the delicious promise of a swim in the evenings in the mirror calm waters.

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Ages of Art – Ancient Frescos of Breage and Newlyn School Paintings of St Hilary

Detail St Christopher - Breage church frescoWe took a look at some of the ages of art yesterday in our local churches, visiting the 15th century Frescoes in Breage church and the Penzance and Newlyn school paintings in St Hilary – well worth a detour if you are looking for a different interest on you holiday in Cornwall.

We’ve been meaning to visit the frescos in Breage Church  and a recent visit to Godolphin House to see the Bluebells proved the perfect catalyst as we “passed” Breage on the way home.

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