My October garden – the season’s ticking clock

The big paddle shaped leaves of the bronze bananas plant with the mellow stone building of Ednovean Farm beyondAs I watch the garden mellow  this month  into the subtle shades of autumn, I can almost hear the ticking clock of the season – louder now with the change in the hour this weekend. But we are lucky here at Ednovean Farm that the garden remains vibrant, with the big clumps of Pampas grasses flower in a last dramatic flourish for the autumn and on the terrace a few Olives are ripening on the trees

A garden visit!

A lutchens style bench framed by a palm tree and evergreen plantingI was thrilled this weekend when Ian and Sue Lowe came to visit our garden again after seeing our garden as “Garden of the week in Gardening News. Ian designed the Parterre courtyard gardens in what was Ednovean Farm’s old farmyard back in the year 2000 and subsequently the Italian Gardens in 2001. So I held my breath like the mother of a child, as he looked around the maturing gardens and Phew! He loved the way the gardens had developed over the intervening years. I’ve missed his infectious enthusiasm and love of plants and the chance to discuss plans for the gardens as we strolled around the paths.

October in the garden

Traditional granite farmhouse with blue skies and autumn garden planting

The pampas seeds are still elegantly weaving their magic in the breeze this October and much to my surprise the yuccas have pushed up beautiful creamy flower spires around the garden..

Olives ripening in the autumn sunshine This month the film prop pergola was relocated to the Italian Garden discreetly tucked behind the tall hedges and now waits for climbing plants – What d you think about white roses?

Our Brugmansia, a veteran of many years, has produced a flamboyant selection of bright orange bells that are best seen from a landing window and on the terrace two of the Olive trees in pots flanking the garden room doorway, have ripening Olives amongst their sparse foliage. The Olives that are planting behind the Italian Garden just produce endless leaves in protest of their shadowy location. Ah well the right plant in the right place as they say and in truth the Romans would have introduces Olive trees if they had really been viable in the British climate …..But I can dream of course!

About Christine Taylor

Charles and Christine Taylor have hosted Luxury Bed and Breakfast at Ednovean Farm Nr Penzance in West Cornwall since 1991 and live there with three cats and eight horses including a Spanish Stallion called Danni. Christine writes a weekly blog about life on the farm and garden with an occasional series about places of interest in West Cornwall

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