Coastal walks and harbour pubs

Trebarvah beach linked to Perranuthnoe

Just east of Perranuthnoe, a hidden slipway leads to Trebarvah Beach reached by a hidden slipway or walk along the sands from Perran at very low tide.

There is something so evocative of the memories Cornish holidays of spending the days wandering around the coastal footpath before finally settling in a secluded cove to picnic and then later, much later, driving around the Bay to find a traditional harbour side pub for supper. It has to be Fish and Chips of course anything else would be sacrilege to tradition!

This bank Holiday the weather has been so kind to Cornwall and we have basked in the sunshine and we were tempted to walk again down to the coastal footpath to see the last of the spring flowers with the tide lapping the rocks below us.

Cornwall's blue clear seas adn wild flowers at cudden point

Blue seas and sea thrift at Cudden Point

The sea has been impossibly blue this week still with the bright froth of sea pinks setting off the coastal colours perfectly.

As we walked down to the sea we passed the last of the blue bells lingering on in the moist shadows under the banks and they have been joined now by the bright spears of the Foxgloves as spring slowly slips into summer.

sea views walking eastwards from Ednovean Farm looking over Mounts Bay

We looked back over the sweep of Mount’s Bay and majestic St Michael’s Mount, beyond the retreating tide on Perranuthnoe beach

 

 

There is always that childlike thrill for me of spotting a secluded cove tucked nearly out of sight of the coastal footpath where we will spend the day idly picnicking and spuddling around the seashore searching for the illusive cowry shells that hide amongst the flotsam left by the tide.

Yathc moored by Perranuthnoe beyond st Michael's Mount

A yacht moored just off of Perran’s Beach – later it sailed for Penzance Harbour

The sea slowly retreated from our little beach and the sun slipped away to our west calling us home with jobs to be done but not before we had taken the lower path back to Perranuthnoe. We admired a yacht moored just off of the beach, perfectly framed by St Michael’s Mount and Trebarvah beach exposed by the tide along the way before threading our way the surprising throng of visitors in Perranuthnoe. We retreated from the traffic into the farm’s bottom gate and saw the hay being cut for the horses winter feed – how the seasons turn in the rhythm of the countryside.

Harbourside pubs.

Every harbour in Cornwall has at least one cheerful atmospheric pub serving traditional unpretentious food with swift efficiency. One of our favourites is The Ship Inn in Mousehole. I love the evening drive around the western part of Mounts Bay following the sea passed the harbours of Penzance and fishing port of Newlyn full of  fishing boats before finally dropping down into Mousehole to park (in good weather!) on one of the harbour arms. There is always an air of a day well spent amongst the groups of visitors and locals alike as the sea lazily laps the hulls of the little boats below.

Now for me a harbour side pub supper has to be Fish and chips, that traditional stalwart of seaside holidays. We found a corner beside a deep shuttered window to watch the world go by in the street outside and occasionally a fishing boat beat its way passed on its way back to Newlyn. We watched the Scillonian glide passed on her way back from the Scilly isles taking her passengers back to Penzance too so all in all the rhythm of the day was as uninterrupted as it had been for centuries – now for the fish and chips!

Fish and chips in a cornish pub

Fish and chips in the harbourside pub in Mousehole The ship Inn

To see the cliffs earlier in the spring try my blog “A spring walk to the sea”

About Christine Taylor

Charles and Christine Taylor have hosted Luxury Bed and Breakfast at Ednovean Farm Nr Penzance in West Cornwall since 1991 and live there with three cats and eight horses including a Spanish Stallion called Danni. Christine writes a weekly blog about life on the farm and garden with an occasional series about places of interest in West Cornwall

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